The Friday, July 29, Column

Local Musician Spotlight – Dennis Cordellos

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Dennis Cordellos

Born in San Francisco, the Cordellos family made the trek north to Sonoma in 1956, when young Dennis Cordellos was just three years old. Originally Greek immigrants, they bought the vacant lot on the Northwest corner of Napa St. and Fifth Street West from the Norrboms  and proceeded to build what, at the time, was the largest grocery store in Sonoma Valley, Valley Mart. You may know it now as Sonoma Market.

Cordellos attended school here in the Valley and by seven years of age, was playing in the Prestwood School band. Throughout high school, he played with many long-time Sonoma musicians, of which many are still here today. Jeff Falconer, Ed Delaney, Johnn ‘King Daddy” Murphy, the late Michael Hinton, to name a few. His parents saw that Cordellos had a gift for music on the guitar, and in his senior year, he attended a school that focused just on music, the Bear Wallow School, a short lived, experimental high school that was at the Westerbeke Ranch in El Verano.

Fresh out of high school, Cordellos was playing large venues with a number of musicians, the Circle Star Theater in San Carlos with Sonoma vocalist Paula Sumante. By 20 years of age, Cordellos was fronting his own act, Pacific Coast Highway, and landed a steady gig at the Playboy Club in San Francisco, playing five nights a week. After a couple years they took the act on the road, touring the country playing popular cover songs and even landing at another Playboy Club in Phoenix Az. But tragedy would soon strike the band with the death of their bass player in a car accident and Cordellos, reflecting on the circumstances, made it back to Sonoma.

His father gave him a full-time job at the Valley Mart where he stayed for a couple years, got married, raised a daughter, still playing music and eventually putting Pacific Coast Highway back together, this time as an original act playing around Northern California. By 1980, Cordellos had gotten his real estate license and had a job with the flexibility to still play music, both of which he still does. Currently living in Santa Rosa, Cordellos is still a fixture in the Sonoma Valley music scene.

Cordellos will be appearing with the Jami Jamison Band tonight, July 29, for a show at Sebastiani Winery kicking off at 6 p.m. We managed to touch bases with Cordellos, so let’s find out a little more about him with the usual six questions.

1) Many musicians in our generation cite the Beatles on Ed Sullivan as that moment when they knew music was what they wanted to do. When and what was it that made you realize you wanted to be a musician?

DC > It was watching Ozzie and Harriet, believe it or not. At the end of the show, their son, Ricky Nelson always came out and played a song. I saw that and knew I wanted to do that too.

2) That first instrument you owned. What was it and do you still have it?

DC> No, I don’t have it. It was a Stella small-body guitar that I bought at Ruggles Music on the Plaza for 15 dollars. I honestly don’t know where it went.

3) Who are you’re primary influences in your music?

DC >  A combination of people, Duane Allman to George Benson, Kenny Burrell to Carlos Santana. I’ve listened to a lot of different musicians.

4) What CD or playlist is in your car or your iPod?

DC> Funny, the CD in there now is Jerry Douglas, likely the best slide guitar player in Nashville, but it could be anything. I’m not really particular and like to hear things I don’t hear often. I could throw the last Eagles CD in and be happy.

5) Tell us about your current acts.

DC > The Jami Jamison Band has been my primary gig over the last 20 years, under a couple different names with a number of players, with Jami and I being the anchors. But I have a couple other things going as well. Jeff Falconer and I have our Jaydub and Dino duo that we gig out a lot with, (side note: That act will be at Schug Winery on Saturday, July 30. See the Set List for more details) I also have a jazz trio with Keith Ridenhour and Tom Buckman, a jazz quartet called Ambiance and a project with Ed Delaney, Al Rice and Mark Gallagher.

6) If you could have written one song, which one would it be and why?

DC> Man, I can’t answer that. Maybe Spirit in the Sky by Norman Greenbaum. It’s a song that has lived on and we know him and he’s a great guy, so I guess that would be one.

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tsunami
Tsunami

Set List – The Rundown

Annex Wine Bar, 865 W. Napa St. Sonoma, 938-7779
Tonight, July 29: Full Circle. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 30: Mark Larson Band. 7:30 p.m.

Barking Dog Roasters, 18133 Sonoma Hwy. Sonoma, 939-1905
Saturday, July 30: Michael L. Castle. 3 p.m.
Sunday, July 31: Tim  McNamee. 3 p.m.

B. R. Cohn Winery, 15000 Sonoma Hwy. Glen Ellen, 800-330-4064
Sunday, July 31: Don Trotta and Dann Walters.  2 p.m.

Cornerstone, 23570 Arnold Dr, Carneros, 933-3010
Saturday, July 30: Pete Olson. 1 p.m.
Sunday, July 31: Dale Geist. 1 p.m.

Friday Farmers Market, Depot Park, 270 First St W. Sonoma
Today, July 29: Stewart Degner. 9:30 a.m.

HopMonk Tavern, 691 Broadway Sonoma, 935-9100
Tonight, July 29: John Lester. 5 p.m. Timothy O’Neil. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 30: Michael Bloch. 1 p.m. Sean Carscadden. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 31: Smorgy. 1 p.m.

Hood Mansion Lawn, N. Pythian Rd off Hwy 12, Santa Rosa, 833-6288
Tonight, July 29: “Funky Fridays” with Gator Nation. 7 p.m.

Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St. E. Sonoma, 935-0660
Tonight, July 29: Sonoma Sound Syndicate. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 30: Tsunami. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 31: Dave Hooper Trio. 2 p.m.

Olde Sonoma Public House, 18615 Sonoma Hwy. Boyes Hot Springs, 938-7587
Saturday, July 30: Karaoke. 7:30 p.m.

Plaza Bistro, 420 First St E. Sonoma, 996-4466
Saturday, July 30: Hannah Lind. 6 p.m.

Rossi’s 1906 Dancehall, 401 Grove St. El Verano, 343-0044
Tonight, July 29: Closed for private event
Saturday, July 30: Gethen Jenkins and the Freightshakers. 9 p.m.
Sunday, July 31: Hot Grubb. 5 p.m. Blues Jam. 9:30 p.m.

Schellville Grill, 22900 Broadway, Sonoma, 996-5151
Saturday, July 30: Butch Engle and Styx. 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 31: Butch Engle and Styx. 12:30 p.m.

Schug Carneros Winery, 602 Bonneau Road, Carneros, 939-9363
Saturday, July 30: Jaydub and Dino. 1 p.m.

Sebastiani Winery and Vineyards, 389 Fourth St. E. Sonoma, 933-3230
Tonight, July 29: Jami Jamison Band. 6 p.m.

Sonoma Speakeasy and American Music Hall, 452 First St. E. ste. G. Sonoma, 996-1364
Tonight, July 29: Bossonova Duo. 5 p.m. The Disclosures. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 30: Full Circle. 5 p.m. S. E. Willis, Bobby Cochran and Ruth Davies. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 31: “Open Mic and Mimosas.” 1 to 7 p.m. Acrosonics. 5 p.m.

Sonoma Valley Woman’s Club, 574 First St. E., 938-8313
Saturday, July 30: Hawaiian Jam Session.  2 p.m.

If your gig isn’t in my column, you didn’t tell me about it. jmberry@sonomamusic.com

The Tuesday, July 26, Column

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Carlos Reyes – Photo: sonomanews.com

Weekday Rundown

Annex Wine Bar, 865 W. Napa St. Sonoma, 938-7779
Wednesday, July 27: Calvin Ross. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 28: Mad and Eddie Duran. 7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 29: Full Circle. 7:30 p.m.

El Verano Inn, 705 Laurel Ave. El Verano, 935-0611
Tonight, July 26: Neelix One presents Karaoke, 9 p.m.

Friday Farmers Market, Depot Park, 270 First St W. Sonoma
Friday, July 29: Stewart Degner. 9:30 a.m.

HopMonk Tavern, 691 Broadway Sonoma, 935-9100
Wednesday, July 27: Open – Mic Night, 8 p.m.
Friday, July 29: John Lester. 5 p.m. Timothy O’Neil. 8 p.m.

Lawn of Hood Mansion, N. Pythian Rd off Hwy 12, Santa Rosa, 833-6288
Friday, July 29: Funky Fridays with Gator Nation. 7 p.m.

Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St. E. Sonoma, 935-0660
Tonight, July 26: Nor Cal Art Duo. 7 p.m.
Friday, July 29: Sonoma Sound Syndicate. 8 p.m.

Rossi’s 1906 Dancehall, 401 Grove St. El Verano, 343-0044
Thursday, July 28: Open Mic Night. 8 p.m.
Friday, July 29: Closed for private party.

Sebastiani Winery and Vineyards, 389 Fourth St. E. Sonoma, 933-3230
Friday, July 29: Jami Jamison Band. 6 p.m.

Sonoma Plaza, 1 Broadway, Sonoma
Tuesday Night Market. Tonight, July 26: Sugarfoot. 6 p.m.

Sonoma Plaza, 1 Broadway, Sonoma
City Party. Thursday, July 28: Carlos Reyes, THC, Halsey and the Hi-Hats and ConTigo. 5:30 p.m.

Sonoma Speakeasy and American Music Hall, 452 First St. E. ste. G. Sonoma, 996-1364
Tonight, July 26: “New Orleans R&B and American Roots Night” with the Lou A. Rodriguez, Tim Eschliman and Bruce Gordon. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 28: “Singer Sit-In Night” with Dallis Craft. 7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 29: Bossonova Duo. 5 p.m. The Disclosures. 8 p.m.

If your gig isn’t in my column, you didn’t tell me about it. jmberry@sonomamusic.com

The Friday, July 22, Column

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Peace of G

Soundbytes – Rossi’s Double Bill

It’s a double-bill at Rossi’s 1906 Dancehall tonight, July 22, with the debut of a new act and an act that doesn’t get out much. Peace of G is Gerard Serafini’s new band that features his own material done with his own special twist. “ I’ve been wanting to put together something like this for a long time” said Serafini, “ and the pieces just seemed to finally fall into place.” A Long-time Grateful Dead fan, the songs have a “jam band” feel with the ability to stretch out the music to unexplored areas. Serafini has put together a couple veterans from his other act, Ten Foot Tone, with Michael Noel on guitar and Dave McKee on drums, and has added in Michael Lipuma on bass to accompany himself on vocals and guitar. For this debut performance, Serafini will also have Glenn Sullivan on trumpet and Rick Clifford on saxophone. The show kicks off at 8 p.m. and for more info on the act, point your browser to peaceofg.com

Next up for a 10 p.m. show is the John Burdick Band. Although the current version of the act has been playing for years, they don’t play out much, due to Burdick and his wife, Catherine Venturini, being busy running the popular “Olive and Vine” restaurant in Glen Ellen. With the restaurant transitioning to a new location, Burdick has his weekends freed up a bit and has time to “put the band back together” Originally from Chicago, Burdick arrived in Sonoma via Colorado and Hollywood, where he cut his musical teeth in both scenes, opening for acts like Keb Mo and more. Burdick is a passionate player, and you can see it in his playing and the lyrics he composes, singing about his experiences and the struggles of life in general in these times. The band recently came off a short Caribbean cruise tour where they shared the stage with Kenny Loggins, Three Dog Night, Nestor Torres and more. To find out more about the band, point your browser to johnburdickmusic.com

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Mark your calendars if you haven’t already, as the annual Sonoma City Party is right around the corner, slated for next Thursday, July 28, at 5:30 p.m. Traditionally on a Tuesday with the Tuesday Night Market, the date had to be changed once the market expanded to use the back of City Hall, where the party used to take place. In addition to the numerous food and drink options, the party is presenting four musical acts. Headlining the night will be Carlos Reyes, supported by ConTigo, Halsey and the Hi-Hats and THC. Reyes is a world-class electric violin player and has toured with the Steve Miller Band, Roy Rogers, the Zac Brown Band and more. ConTigo plays soul, funk and rock. Halsey and the Hi-Hats takes you back to the swing-era with danceable swing tunes and THC plays classic rock and pop.

The annual event is free and open to the public. For more info, point your browser to sonomacityparty.com

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Gerard Serafini – Photo: Sonomanews.com

Local Musician Spotlight – Gerard Serafini

A Sonoma Valley Native, Gerard Serafini’s family homesteaded Sonoma almost 70 years ago, and have been living on the family property since. A musical household, young Serafini had two older brothers who both played in bands during the whole ‘60’s music revolution. With instruments laying around and a taught chord on a guitar here and there, it wasn’t long before Serafini was playing and writing songs, in fact, his first performance in seventh grade had him performing one of his original songs with long-time friend Glenn Sullivan.

As the ‘80s rolled on, Serafini found himself bouncing between playing clubs in San Francisco and Marin and having a full-time audio visual engineer job, which had him doing sound and video on the All Madden show among others. But, 16-18 days a month on the road is tough to do when you have small children, so Serafini took a job at a local music store, run by legendary luthier Steve Klein, eventually taking over the space and changing the name to Sonoma Valley Music.

Like many industries, the Internet had it’s way with video rentals, record stores and even music stores and Serafini was forced to close the doors. After a brief health set back, Serafini decided to scale things back and focus on his own songs, which he had been writing for years and put together a music catalog. An opportunity from Music Nomad Equipment Care came along, where Serafini could represent the environmentally-friendly music products and essentially work from his house that has allowed him to do just that, and his new act “Peace of G” became a realization.

Serafini will be doing his debut performance with the band tonight, July 22, for a show at Rossi’s 1906 Roadhouse, kicking off at 8 p.m. We managed to touch bases with Serafini so let’s find out a little more about him with the usual six questions.

1) Many musicians in our generation cite the Beatles on Ed Sullivan as that moment when they knew music was what they wanted to do. When and what was it that made you realize you wanted to be a musician?

GS > It was a Television show, but a different one for me. It was the Smothers Brothers and the Who was on the show. As one of the skits, or not, Pete Townsend grabbed Tommy’s acoustic guitar and smashed it to pieces (Townsend was famous for that in his act). That was pretty much it. I actually got to tell Tommy that story and thank him for setting me up on the path that would eventually become my career.

2) That first instrument you owned. What was it and do you still have it?

GS> No, I don’t have it. I had already decided I wanted to be a bass player after seeing Woody Herman and the Woodchoppers Ball but my parents got me a classical guitar, so it didn’t get played much by me.

3) Who are you’re primary influences in your music?

GS > Well, from an “old-school” perspective, the Who and the Grateful Dead. I probably saw the dead a hundred times. For now though, it’s Jon Shannon Williams, my singer-songwriter in my band Ten Foot Tone. He is a constant inspiration to me and keeps me focused on the song, among other things.

4) What CD or playlist is in your car or your iPod?

GS> “Peace of G” tracks. I honestly don’t listen to the radio or even popular songs, or have playlists or anything. I’m too much a tech-geek and I start breaking down the song as to where the mics may have been placed during recording or how much reverb the producer was using before I even hear the vocals or the song itself. I guess instrumentals are likely my favorite.

5) Tell us about your current acts.

GS > “Ten Foot Tone” and my new act “Peace of G.” That’s pretty much it. We’ve been doing Ten Foot Tone for almost 10 years now and the new act is really all my songs, my personality, with all my twists to music..

6) If you could have written one song, which one would it be and why?

GS> Oh man.. that’s tough. Hmmm. It wouldn’t be one song, but an entire album. Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon. When you listen to it, it is kind of like one long song.

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jami
Jami Jamison

Set List – The Rundown

Annex Wine Bar, 865 W. Napa St. Sonoma, 938-7779
Tonight, July 22: David Bingham. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 23: Noah Trettor. 7:30 p.m.

Barking Dog Roasters, 18133 Sonoma Hwy. Sonoma, 939-1905
Saturday, July 23: Carl and Eddie. 3 p.m.
Sunday, July 24: Dave Hooper. 3 p.m.

B. R. Cohn Winery, 15000 Sonoma Hwy. Glen Ellen, 800-330-4064
Sunday, July 24: JMB and the Big O.  2 p.m.

El Verano Inn, 705 Laurel Ave. El Verano, 935-0611
Saturday, July 23: Punk Rock with Imbalanced, Heap of Stone, Eat the Crow, the Quitters, Kitten Drunk and Tri-Polar. 8 p.m.

Friday Farmers Market, Depot Park, 270 First St W. Sonoma
Today, July 22: Stewart Degner. 9:30 a.m.

HopMonk Tavern, 691 Broadway Sonoma, 935-9100
Tonight, July 22: Solid Air. 5 p.m. Kendra McKinley. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 23: Dan Martin. 1 p.m. Frankie Bourne. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 24: Nate Lopez. 1 p.m.

Hood Mansion Lawn, N. Pythian Rd off Hwy 12, Santa Rosa, 833-6288
Tonight, July 22: “Funky Fridays” with the Blues Burners. 7 p.m.

Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St. E. Sonoma, 935-0660
Tonight, July 22: Sean Carscadden Trio. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 23: Z and the Benders. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 24: Tony Gibson and Dawn Angelosante. 2 p.m.

Muscardini Cellars, 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 933-9305
Saturday, May 23: “Simmer Down Saturday” with the Jami Jamison Band. 6 p.m.

Olde Sonoma Public House, 18615 Sonoma Hwy. Boyes Hot Springs, 938-7587
Saturday, July 23: Karaoke. 7:30 p.m.

Rossi’s 1906 Dancehall, 401 Grove St. El Verano, 343-0044
Tonight, July 22: Peace of G. 8 p.m. John Burdick Band 10 p.m.
Saturday, July 23: Stone Cold Mollie. 9 p.m.
Sunday, July 24: Three Times Bad. 5 p.m. Blues Jam. 9:30 p.m.

Schellville Grill, 22900 Broadway, Sonoma, 996-5151
Saturday, July 23: Butch Engle and Styx. 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 24: Butch Engle and Styx. 12:30 p.m.

Sebastiani Winery and Vineyards, 389 Fourth St. E. Sonoma, 933-3230
Tonight, July 22: Poyntlyss Sistars. 6 p.m.

Sonoma Speakeasy and American Music Hall, 452 First St. E. ste. G. Sonoma, 996-1364
Tonight, July 22: Ryan Tatarian. 6:30 p.m. Loosely Covered. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 23: The Marks Brothers. 5 p.m. Iko Ya Ya. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 24: “Open Mic and Mimosas.” 1 to 7 p.m. Acrosonics. 4 p.m.

If your gig isn’t in my column, you didn’t tell me about it. jmberry@sonomamusic.com

 

The Tuesday, July 19, Column

Sean Carscadden
Sean Carscadden

Weekday Rundown

Annex Wine Bar, 865 W. Napa St. Sonoma, 938-7779
Wednesday, July 20: Judy Williams. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 21: Vic Moraga. 7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 22: David Bingham. 7:30 p.m.

El Verano Inn, 705 Laurel Ave. El Verano, 935-0611
Tonight, July 19: Neelix One presents Karaoke, 9 p.m.

FAHA Heritage Center, 197 W. Verano Ave. Sonoma, 938-0418
Tuesday, July 19: the Helsinki Evangelical Choir and the Obstrobothnian Evangelical Wind Ensemble. 2 p.m

Friday Farmers Market, Depot Park, 270 First St W. Sonoma
Friday, July 22: Stewart Degner. 9:30 a.m.

HopMonk Tavern, 691 Broadway Sonoma, 935-9100
Wednesday, July 20: Open – Mic Night, 8 p.m.
Friday, July 22: Solid Air. 5 p.m. Kendra McKinley. 8 p.m.

Lawn of Hood Mansion, N. Pythian Rd off Hwy 12, Santa Rosa, 833-6288
Friday, July 22: Funky Fridays with the Blues Burners. 7 p.m.

Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St. E. Sonoma, 935-0660
Tonight, July 19: Tonewoods. 7 p.m.
Friday, July 22: Sean Carscadden Trio. 8 p.m.

Rossi’s 1906 Dancehall, 401 Grove St. El Verano, 343-0044
Thursday, July 21: Open Mic Night. 8 p.m.
Friday, July 22: Peace of G and the John Burdick Band. 8:00 p.m.

Sebastiani Winery and Vineyards, 389 Fourth St. E. Sonoma, 933-3230
Friday, July 22: Poyntlyss Sistars. 6 p.m.

Sonoma Plaza, 1 Broadway, Sonoma
Tuesday Night Market. Tonight, July 19: Foxes in the Henhouse. 6 p.m.

Sonoma Speakeasy and American Music Hall, 452 First St. E. ste. G. Sonoma, 996-1364
Tonight, July 19: “New Orleans R&B and American Roots Night” with the Lou A. Rodriguez, Tim Eschliman and Bruce Gordon. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 21: “Singer Sit-In Night” with Dallis Craft. 7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 22: Loosely Covered. 8 p.m.

If your gig isn’t in my column, you didn’t tell me about it. jmberry@sonomamusic.com

The Friday, July 15, Column

TrevorMcSpadden

Local Musician Spotlight – Trevor McSpadden

McSpadden grew up in the central Texas hills, where he was fed a steady diet of two-step and dance hall music as a child, with his dad bringing him to see some of the big acts coming through town and attending dances in the clubs with his friends, where teenagers were welcome to come “join the party.” Once the musician bug bit him, he left Austin for Chicago, where he fronted the country act “the Hoyle Brothers.” Stepping out as a solo artist, he now has Grammy-winning producer Pete Anderson producing him and has just released his latest album “ The Only Way.”

McSpadden brings his act to Sonoma Valley on Sunday, June 17, for a late afternoon show at Rossi’s 1906 Roadhouse, kicking off at 5 p.m. We managed to touch bases with McSpadden so let’s find out a little more about him with the usual six questions.

1) Many musicians in our generation cite the Beatles on Ed Sullivan as that moment when they knew music was what they wanted to do. When and what was it that made you realize you wanted to be a musician?

TM > Well, I’m only in my 30’s so I missed most of all that, but it was my dad taking me to see music with him growing up in Austin, acts like Junior Brown and Dale Watson, but the act that really did it for me was the Derailers. The had a West Coast- Buck Owens kind of sound going and I thought I’d really love to be able to play songs like that.

2) That first instrument you owned. What was it and do you still have it?

TM > Oh it was a cheap Japanese copy of a Gibson called a Conqueror. It was a big guitar, a Hummingbird knock off. It was my grandpas and no, we don’t own it any longer. He donated it to a local music school in Austin for kids that didn’t have instruments to play. It really didn’t bother me at the time but now I kind of wish I still had it. I just hope some kid is playing it out there somewhere.

3) Who are you’re primary influences in your music?

TM > The Central Texas dance scene. My folks would get all us kids into a Suburban and drop us off at the dance halls. But it was Nick Lowe that truly spoke to me in music. The way he captures a phrase and really has a classic sound, not retro, but classic. There’s a big difference between those two.

4) What CD or playlist is in your car or your iPod?

TM > Well, I’m driving my car now so let’s see. I like to go to the local library and just borrow CD’s and have a variety of music to listen to. Looks like the two I have now are Loretta Lynn and Porter Wagoner.

5) Tell us about your current acts.

TM > I’m kind of new to California so I don’t really have a band, but a roster of musicians that play with me depending on the venue. I usually like just a duo or trio but can have a big band available if the venue is right for it. This weekend I have Dave Gleason on guitar and Tim Sarter on bass. Gleason is a real honky-tonk picker with a Bakersfield feel. He gets a real Buck Owens vibe out of his Telecaster.

6) If you could have written one song, which one would it be and why?

TM> Oh boy, I’d have to say “Help me Make it through the Night” by Kris Kristofferson. We play that song at about every show we do, and the simplicity of it is the magic of country western songwriting, to me anyways.

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Vintage Festival Music Press Release

July, 13, 2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: James Marshall Berry – Mediacomm@sonomavinfest.org

Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival announces Weekend Musical Acts
“Country Sunday” to wrap up the weekend

SONOMA, CA – The volunteer Board of Directors for the Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival has announced the musical entertainment for the weekend with two full days of free live music

“We really wanted to feature the local musical acts from Sonoma this year and we think there’s something for everyone” said Maria Toimil, president of the festival board, which is exactly what the theme is for Saturday, Sept. 24, “Something for Everyone.”

Kicking off the day at 11 a.m. is local teen act Heroes Turn Human who recently won the battle of the bands in Santa Rosa. Next up is the Rich Little Band, with Scott DeMartini and two local winemakers, Rich Little and Jeff Bundschu, playing unique versions of rock songs with some originals as well. T Luke and the Tight Suits are up next. Bandleader Luke Domingue is the son of the late Ritchie Domingue from the band Gator Beat and proving the apple doesn’t fall from the tree, the act puts on an electric set of Cajun-Zydeco dance songs. Who doesn’t like the Beatles? Rubber Soul, the local acoustic-electric Beatles tribute act has been packing rooms all over Sonoma Valley and will have you singing along and dancing in no time at all. Wrapping up the day is the Pulsators with their own style of Louisiana dance music, laced with R & B and even a little Reggae.

Sunday, Sept. 25, it’s “Sonoma Country Sunday” with three country acts that will have you dancing all day long. The day kicks off at noon with Buck Nickels and Loose Change, featuring Buck Nickels on guitar. Next up is Western Swing Hall of Famer Tommy Thomsen with his band of all stars, stepping away from the swing for a day to play some good old country music. Wrapping up the day will be Train Wreck Junction. Nick Kardum and the band have been taking over Northern California playing those classic country songs that no other bands seem to play, and people are loving it.

Music for the weekend is free of charge and open to the public and families are invited to come down to the Sonoma Plaza and enjoy some local music talent.

The Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival is celebrating its 119th year and is the second oldest festival in California, following the Rose Parade. The festival is always held on the last full weekend in September. The festival is free and open to the public; proceeds benefit many local Sonoma Valley nonprofits including Native Sons of the Golden West, Parlor #111, Sonoma Jr. Dragons, Sonoma Fire Department, Volunteers in Policing, Sonoma Valley High School Wrestling and  Cross Country Team and Hanna Boys Center. For more information on the Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival, please visit valleyofthemoonvintagefestival.com or contact the office at 707-996-2109.

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Tri Tip Trio – Photo: sonomanews.com

Set List – The Rundown

Annex Wine Bar, 865 W. Napa St. Sonoma, 938-7779
Tonight, July 15: The Mesopotamians. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 16: Calvin Ross and Friends 7:30 p.m.

Barking Dog Roasters, 18133 Sonoma Hwy. Sonoma, 939-1905
Saturday, July 16: Jam Session. 3 p.m.
Sunday, July 17: Stewart Degner. 3 p.m.

B. R. Cohn Winery, 15000 Sonoma Hwy. Glen Ellen, 800-330-4064
Sunday, July 17: Falcon Christopher.  2 p.m.

Friday Farmers Market, Depot Park, 270 First St W. Sonoma
Today, July 15: Stewart Degner. 9:30 a.m.

HopMonk Tavern, 691 Broadway Sonoma, 935-9100
Tonight, July 15: Pat Hull. 5 p.m. Jimbo Scott. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 16: Amy Obenski. 1 p.m. Kyle Williams. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 17: Jill Cohn. 1 p.m.

Hood Mansion Lawn, N. Pythian Rd off Hwy 12, Santa Rosa, 833-6288
Tonight, July 15: “Funky Fridays” with the Rosetown Soul and R&B Revue. 7 p.m.

Larson Family Winery, 23355 Millerick Rd, Sonoma, 938-3031
Sunday, July 17: Frankie Bourne. 10:30 a.m.

Madrone Estate Winery, 777 Madrone Rd. Glen Ellen, 939-4500
Saturday, July 16: The Valley of the Moon Chamber Ensemble. 5:30 p.m.

Many Moons Ranch, 18500 Carriger Rd. Sonoma, 373-0700 – Tickets Required
Saturday, July 16: “Jazz in the Barn” with Kim Prevost and Bill Solley. 7 p.m.

Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St. E. Sonoma, 935-0660
Saturday, July 16: Perfect Crime. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 17: Doug Adamz. 2 p.m.

Olde Sonoma Public House, 18615 Sonoma Hwy. Boyes Hot Springs, 938-7587
Saturday, July 16: Karaoke. 7:30 p.m.

Plaza Bistro, 420 First St E. Sonoma, 996-4466
Tonight, July 15: Pop-Up dinner and T Luke and the Tight Suits. 7 p.m.

Rossi’s 1906 Dancehall, 401 Grove St. El Verano, 343-0044
Tonight, July 15: Tri-Tip Trio. 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 16: The Old Folks. 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 17: Trevor McSpadden. 5 p.m. Blues Jam. 9:30 p.m.

Schellville Grill, 22900 Broadway, Sonoma, 996-5151
Saturday, July 16: Butch Engle and Styx. 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 17: Butch Engle and Styx. 12:30 p.m.

Schug Carneros Winery, 602 Bonneau Road, Carneros, 939-9363
Saturday, July 16: Jamie Clark. 1 p.m.

Sebastiani Winery and Vineyards, 389 Fourth St. E. Sonoma, 933-3230
Tonight, July 15: Sugarfoot. 6 p.m.

Sonoma Plaza, Grinstead Ampitheater, 1 Broadway, Sonoma
Saturday, July 16: Cannon School of Music Drum Circle. 10 a.m.

Sonoma Speakeasy and American Music Hall, 452 First St. E. ste. G. Sonoma, 996-1364
Tonight, July 15: Ryan Tatarian. 6:30 p.m. Champagne Groove. 8 p.m.
Saturday, July 16: Full Circle. 5 p.m. Left Coast Syncopators. 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 17: “Open Mic and Mimosas.” 1 to 7 p.m. Bossonova Duo. 1 p.m. Acrosonics. 4 p.m.

If your gig isn’t in my column, you didn’t tell me about it. jmberry@sonomamusic.com